Tieke.

In the early 1900s, Tieke was a well populated kainga, but it was abandoned in 1908. When I saw and used it in the 1950s and 60s, it was an overgrown area conveniently located for camping.

About 1957, the Wanganui River Scenic Board was established to promote tourism on the river. It built a chain of huts along the river and named them after members of the Scenic Board. The John Coull Hut, now rebuilt and relocated is the sole remaining reminder of that era.

As the hut they built at Tieke was up on the flat just at the top of the river bank it was vulnerable to damage by floods. However, there was a a wet weather shelter build further back from the river.

On a trip about 1968, the weather was inclement and so we (a party of 4) decided to make use of the hut. But the floods had somewhat distorted it. So we just used it for cooking. Sleeping there was out of the question as the bunks were anything but horizontal and we used the wet weather shelter instead. .

Tieke hut

                                                                                                          Photo: Jim Parnell.

This is the Scenic Board's Tieke Hut, damaged by a flood.

.

                                                                                                          Photo: Jim Parnell.

Cooking a stew on the skew!

.

The Whanganui River National Park was created in 1986 and as part of the string of facilities they provided along the river, the Department of Conservation (DOC) built a large hut at Tieke. In 1993, Te Whanau o Tieke Maori occupied the hut, arguing that the land was never alienated from them. With consultation between the parties there is harmony now, and DOC and the Tangata Whenua have upgraded the visitor facilities. The Marae has a Wharepuni and Wharekai (Dining Room. Canoeists are welcome to stay and if the Iwi is in residence, receive a powhiri (traditional welcome) onto the Marae.

Tieke Now

                                                                                                          Photo: Jim Parnell.

The Wharepuni and Wharekai at Tieke.

.

Return to my Whanganui River page